FIENS

Celebrating 50 years of service!

The Bassett FIENS Scholarship

The Bassett FIENS Scholarship, established in 2015, enables selected neurosurgeons from FIENS-sponsored programs in developing countries to travel to neurosurgery training programs in North America for a period of 3 months.  Eligible candidates are neurosurgery residents and young faculty members in training programs in the developing world that have dyad relationships with neurosurgery training programs in North America.  The scholarship is sponsored by Mr. Dick Bassett, a FIENS Community Board Member who annually participates in neurosurgery mission trips to Haiti.  Scholarships have been awarded to:

2016  Drs. Thar San & Pyie Win Htut sponsored by Dr. Jack Rock, M. D. at Henry Ford University

2016  Dr. Alex Muhindo sponsored by Dr. Michael Haglund at Duke University  

2017  Dr. Ignatius Enese sponsored by Dr. Robert Dempsey at University of Wisconsin

2017  Dr. Juliet Sekobunga sponsored by Dr. Robert Dempsey at University of Wisconsin

2017  Drs. Aung Thu Soe & Myat Naing Tun sponsored by Dr. Jack Rock, M. D. at Henry Ford University

2018  Drs. Sein Win & Aung Thurein Win sponsored by Dr. Jack Rock, M. D. at Henry Ford University        

2019  Drs. Su Myat Mo & Nang Saw Myat Hnin Aye sponsored by Dr. Jack Rock, M. D. at Henry Ford University  

Reports from Past Award Winners:

2019 - Nang Saw Myat Hnin Aye on left with Su Myat Mo presenting their TBI project at the HFH research Forum in May 2019 during their rotation AT HENRY FORD hOSPITAL, SPONSORED BY FIENS MEMBER JACK ROCK.

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I am Dr. Nang Saw Myat Hnin Aye, a 4th year neurosurgery resident from North Okkalapa Teaching and General Hospital, Yangon, Myanmar. As a clinical rotation in neurosurgery residency program, I have been studied and finished my observationship at Neurosurgery Department, Henry Ford Hospital from 18th April to 10th June 2019.

This is my very first time to visit and study at USA. Being a citzen in  low-middle income country, I could not be able to come to USA by myself alone. But with the help and support from international collaboration, HFHS and some donors, I got the great chance of my rotation.

During my rotation I learned not only neurosurgery knowledge, philosophies and principles from each Faculties, but also the culture and social dealing with people in USA.

For clinical experiences, I got detailed knowledge:

 1) At Neuro ICU: Neurological examination, NeuroICU care and monitoring, Emergency neurosurgical intervention like EVD, NeuroICU rounding and management, Audit on every patients in ICU morning report

 2) At OR: Advanced technique in cranial procedures like Awake craniotomy and brain mapping, DBS for tremor, ROSA stereotactic brain surgery, Laser ablative surgery for epilepsy, Spinal stimulation for cancer pain, Intraoperative USG guided and functional navigated MRI, ETV, Invasive skull base surgery, Neurophysiological monitoring, Endovascular methods like thrombectomy, tumour embolization, AVM embolization, aneurysm coiling

 3)At other wards: Imaging study on neuroradiology, Emergency care and sepsis management at surgical ICU, Rounding in surgical ICU, Sterilization technique

 4) Academic purposes: Skull base neuroanatomy and neuroradiology conference, Neurovascular and neuroradiology conference, Grand rounds on spine stability, intraoperative technique to improve the extent of tumour resection, functional neuroanatomy, Lectures on TBI, basilar tip aneurysm, GCS-P, epilepsy surgery, Greenberg review on every Thursday, Simulation lab on minimally invasive spine surgery by using Modus V, Hands-on cadaveric training on pterional approach, retrosigmoid approach, Hands-on live cadaveric training on aneurysm clipping, Video examination on neurological examination

 5) At clinic and ward round: Social dealing with patient, Spread thinking of differential diagnosis,

6) At HFHS special conference: 15th annual Neuroradiology course, Poster presentation on documentation of TBI in neurosurgical ward, Yangon, Myanmar at 16th annual research symposium elevation survey, 2019

For other experiences, I got a lot of fun in sight seeing around the city, a lot of general knowledge in Detroit historical places and had new taste on many kinds of food like Mexican food, Arabians food and American food. For my traveling and staying, I felt very convenience on that.

 To conclude my letter, I do appreciate all the supporters from FIENS, HFHS, my senior and junior colleges and friends from HFH for their generous hospitality. Moreover I want to acknowledge and grateful to Dr. Jack Rock, Director of Neurosurgery residency program, HFHS for his great effort, kindness and patience to Young Neurosurgeons of Myanmar. And I also hope to be a rotational neurosurgery resident again for further study on Pediatric neurosurgery and skull base neurosurgery. Finally this clinical residency rotation training is very precious and gives much benefits to all my junior neurosurgery residents and for my people's health care.

 God bless America and Myanmar!!

2017 - Dr. Ignatius Esene participating in the simulation labs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, sponsored by FIENS Chair Robert Dempsey.

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2017 - Dr. Juliet Sekobunga (6th from left) participating in the Wisconsin Nerve Symposium while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison sponsored by FIENS Chair Robert Dempsey.

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2016 - Dr. Muhinko and Dr. Mukasa visit to Duke University Hospital sponsored by Michael hAGLUND.

The Bassett Foundation Scholarship recipient who was at Duke in April, Dr. Alex Muhindo; Fellow of the College of Surgeons of Eastern, Southern, and Central Africa (COSECSA).

The Bassett Foundation Scholarship recipient who was at Duke in April, Dr. Alex Muhindo; Fellow of the College of Surgeons of Eastern, Southern, and Central Africa (COSECSA).

Dr. Muhina is the first Ugandan Fellow of COSECA Neurosurgery, trained in the Duke Mulago Program in Uganda, under Co-Directors of the Program Michael Muhumuza, Senior Consultant Neurosurgeon, Mulago Hospital and Michael M. Haglund MD, PhD, MACM, Vice Chair Education and Program Director Duke Neurosurgery Program.


I always heard about Duke University but it was not until April 2016 that I visited this place with my senior colleague, Dr. Mukasa. It was a marvelous experience, especially on our first day. We went to the neurosurgery operating theaters where we watched several complex operations being done in 7 different rooms all at the same time! The rooms had a lot of equipment, including microscopes, monitors, C-arms, neuronavigation, endoscopes and even CT and MRI scans!  All the equipment worked perfectly and there were no intraoperative delays from equipment failure.  The patient care before, during, and after surgery was excellent and patient turnover very efficient. 
We also visited the Neuro ICU and rounded with the several teams of neurointensivists. We hadn't seen an ICU this big, with about 26 beds. They even had a portable CT scanner, which made patient imaging prompt.
We interacted and learnt daily from the Professors, residents, fellows, nurses and support staff.  Overall our experience at Duke was phenomenal and academically enriching.  We thank Professor Haglund and the scholarship that gave me the opportunity to visit Duke and learn so much. 

Alex Muhindo operating on large brain tumor at Mbarara Hospital in Uganda independently as the first trained Neurosurgeon in the Duke Mulago Neurosurgery Training Program. Dr. Haglund watching on video as Dr. Muhindo removes the tumor.

Alex Muhindo operating on large brain tumor at Mbarara Hospital in Uganda independently as the first trained Neurosurgeon in the Duke Mulago Neurosurgery Training Program. Dr. Haglund watching on video as Dr. Muhindo removes the tumor.

Faculty member who accompanied Alex Muhindo to Duke. 

My trip and stay in Duke is going to remain a very wonderful achievement in my life and blessing. From the first day on our arrival in on 4th April, 2016 we were received by our host, Prof Haglund and his wife. This was so touching because Prof Haglund walked straight from theater tired but very happy and took us in a very nice place for our welcoming dinner. 
From the following day real business started.  My dear on our first day into the operating theaters, I simply thought we had entered heaven. 

Not only did we see this magnificent state of art operating theater but all the surgeons would take us through their operations before they started. Then would endeavor to show us or explain to us during their operations.  We definitely learnt quite a lot like resecting and removing an olfactory groove meningioma through a very small incision. In ICU was another experience doing rounds with a nurse, respirator, pharmacist, intensivist and neurologist. Here we saw and learnt how to extensively examine all the systems of a patient. I can't also forget when one of the ICU doctor got an emergency call from Virginia state of a patient with mild stroke. He took us in his office, opened his computer, using Telemedicine managed to get the history and clinical investigation from the patient in their ICU. It was simply amazing.  In Duke we also had a chance to be on night call with a senior resident. 

The morning lectures and presentation attended by all professors and students. Sometimes would also be joined by lecturers from other universities.   All I can say the one month we stayed in Duke gave me a chance to learn the latest technologies and techniques in Neurosurgery.  I learnt to respect the use of team work, above all to always keep time. Learnt the beauty of writing and publishing our work/research. 
 
I think I can write a book on our stay in Duke but let me stop here.  This was very educative experience. Lastly I am very grateful to Professor Haglund and the Duke staff for having invited, planned and made our stay in Duke such a wonderful time. 

From,
Dr.Mukasa John Baptist Nsubuga, 
Neurosurgeon Mulago Hospital, Uganda